Thursday, November 10, 2011

Write It DOWN!!! You NEED a Will

Hey Y'all:

I am a Christian so I'm going to start this very important post with a scripture
Then the LORD replied: "Write down the revelation and make it plain on tablets so that a herald may run with it. Habakkuk 2:2 NIV Translation
Over the past year I have attended about 6 funerals; the dearly departed where either close personal friends of my husband and I and or family members of close personal friends. I was charged with writing the obituary's, reading a scripture and the cards and or creating the entire program for the majority of the services. To say I am sick of death is more than an understatement. I'm really quite sick of the sadness and loss but alas death is part of life. After college we are invited to weddings then baby showers and finally we begin to receive calls, emails or Facebook posts regarding the passing of a friends loved one. It's what happens as you get older but it never every gets easier.

The purpose of this post is to share the most important thing regarding death in my opinion. Not that there aren't a million things that can be shared about being prepared for your passing but this one thing in particular is detrimental to the loved ones you leave behind. The scripture I started this post off with is talking about writing down a revelation or an idea or even a desire you have and making it so plan that anybody could interpret it. I am sharing this because the majority of the people that passed away this year did not write their final wishes down; many of them didn't have life insurance policies either so please check out this post when you can.


It is vital that you make your final wishes known and the best way to do this is to write a living will. I know it may seem morbid to most when I talk about death but death is a part of life. It is the natural cycle or the circle that must be completed.

When my friends mom passed away the day before my 15th wedding anniversary I was so sad for him and our family. I said a prayer for him and volunteered my services for the program. I had no idea that on the day his mom was to be laid to rest it was also the end of his relationship with his mom's family. They were upset with him because he didn't want to transport his mom's remains to NC were she is originally from but rather buried her close to him; so he could visit her final resting place whenever he saw fit. His family was and still is very upset with him and have essentially cut him off. So not only did he loose his mom but also aunts and uncles. This all happened because his mom didn't make her final wishes known.

After that ordeal I had to do my research and share my findings with you on how you can write it down!!!! It being your wishes after death. It doesn't matter if you have no assets you still need to let people know how (and where) you want to be laid to rest. Please check out the information I found on LegalLanguage.com

Various Types of Wills:
  • Simple will: This contains easy instructions for distribution of your assets.
  • Testamentary trust will: This establishes one or more trusts for the distribution of your assets.
  • Pourover will: This type of will places some of your assets into a previously established trust.
  • Holographic will: This must be written in the hand of the person establishing the will. It has no witnesses, and not all jurisdictions will recognize this will as a legal document.
  • Oral or nuncupative will: This type of will is spoken rather than dictated or written. Not all jurisdictions will recognize a nuncupative will as a legal document; it is often used with military personnel.
  • Joint will: This type of will splits the assets and estate of two people, often married couples or partners.
  • Self-proved will: This type of will is established in solemn form with affidavits of witnesses present.
  • Notarial will: This is prepared by a notary in civil law jurisdictions.
  • Mystic will: A mystic will is the term for a will that is sealed until your death.
  • Unsolemn will: This type of will in has an unnamed executor of your estate.

How to Create a Will

There are many requirements that you must be aware of before you create a will.
Before you create any type of will, you must be an adult — at least 18 years old — of sound mind. As mentioned above, there are types of wills that you can write out or speak, but it is advisable to create a typed document with a lawyer or other qualified legal professional and sign it in the presence of witnesses. Your signature should then be notarized to make your will a legal document.

Different states and jurisdictions around the world have different laws and restrictions on what types of wills you can create and what can or cannot be included in your will. For example, some states will not allow you to disinherit close relatives, like children or a spouse.

When to Update Your Will

Updating your will is important whenever a major event happens in your life. Your will should reflect all of your important family members and personal belongings and assets.

You should consider updating your will after any of the following events:
  • You get married or enter into a close relationship.
  • You get divorced.
  • You have or adopt a child.
  • You buy or sell a valuable item, like a piece of property.
  • You change your mind about who you want to manage your estate or receive your assets.

Please be sure to do your research find out what makes the most sense for your family and take action.
Until next time...
MUAH!
Related Posts:
When it's all said and done
For The "If's" In Life

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